ondulate

venusrox:

Blue Chalcedony/ Blue Holy Agate on Matrix

This beautiful rock resembles a small cave of captured blue clouds and its essence is very much a soothing stone. Its blue energy emits a feeling of as if one were to hold an ice pack to an injury, helping one heal any emotional wounds. It offers calm and positivity, helping one be in the ‘now’, rather than worrying what might (or might not!) be. It’s a wonderful stone for assisting with communication and is particularly good for singers!

This rough piece is one of a few pieces we have chosen to appear at the Venusrox showroom and we hope you can enjoy peering into this small haven of blue. 

the-darkest-of-lights

charlottesarahscrivener:

Write the message and put it into a hollow root and bury it.

Burn the message and scatter the ashes in the graveyard

Sing the message to the bones of a dead bird

Write the message on birch bark and slip it into a space between the roots

Go to the crossroads at…

the-darkest-of-lights
archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman!
Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.
More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.
Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.

archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman!

Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.

More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.

Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.